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A leader in documenting man-made climate change, MIT's Ronald Prinn has also made it his business to inform world leaders--and the public--about the risks of ignoring it.
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MIT News | Nov 13, 2007
U.S. greenhouse gas emissions could grow more quickly in the next 50 years than in the previous half-century, even with technological advances and current energy-saving efforts, according to a new study on The Implications of the Historical...
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MIT News | Oct 26, 2007
A novel study by the MIT Global Change Joint Program concludes that increasing levels of ozone due to the growing use of fossil fuels will damage global vegetation, resulting in serious costs to the world's economy. The analysis, reported in the November issue of Energy Policy, focused on how three...
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MIT News | Oct 11, 2007
Boosting ethanol production by growing more corn in the United States without considering the quality and availability of water by region could put a significant strain on water resources in some parts of the country, a committee of the National Research Council said in a report released this week.
Oct 09, 2007

Paul Falkowski, Dianne Newman, Daniel Pauly, Ronald Prinn, Daniel Nocera, Roger Angel, Margaret Leinen, Brad Allenby

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MIT News | Jul 05, 2007
The MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research is one of six organizations to receive support in the first round of grants from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as part of its $100 million initiative to tackle global climate change.
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MIT News | Jun 26, 2007
While Congress considers seven bills that aim to limit America's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, MIT researchers have offered an analysis of the legislation based on a powerful model they created. The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change applied its model to the seven bills...
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Technology Review | May 01, 2007
As the global picture grows grimmer, states and cities are searching for the fine-scale predictions they need to prepare for emergencies--and to keep the faucets running. "The challenge is to increase our capability to accurately forecast climate at the regional level," says Ronald Prinn, an...
Apr 25, 2007

Stephen Schneider reminds policy makers that scientists can't decree what constitutes a perilous increase in global temperatures. - "It's not a scientist's judgment to decide what's dangerous."

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