News Release

Calculating China’s Carbon Emissions from Trade

Tsinghua, MIT researchers find China’s plan to restructure the economy will have limited impacts on reducing global CO2emissions associated with the production and trade of goods.

China is the world’s second largest national economy and its largest exporter. This growth has come at a cost, with energy demands and associated environmental damages on the rise. China is now the world leader in consumer energy use and CO2 emissions. More...

 

Recent Event

Experts Work to Quantify the Impacts of New Policies to Curb Transportation Emissions in China

Researchers consult policymakers on choice of policies to study

The MIT-Tsinghua China Energy and Climate Project and Emory University held a workshop on Thursday November 21st with researchers and government officials to discuss new research analyzing the impacts of China’s vehicle emissions policies. More...

News Release

The Unintended Benefits of Pollution Rules

MIT researchers find China’s new SO2 and NOx regulations will also reduce CO2 emissions.

China’s unprecedented economic growth has created a more affluent society that demands more energy.  The current growth is leading to more emissions from power plants and industries, which threaten human health, the economy and the environment. More...

News Release

Quantifying the Benefits of a National Emissions Trading System in China

MIT and Tsinghua University researchers compare the impacts of current provincial targets to a national emissions trading program.

In a study coming out in the November issue of Energy Economics, a group of researchers from MIT and Tsinghua University test the efficiency and equity of the provincial approach by comparing it to a national carbon-trading program. More...

In the News

MIT Students Win First-Place for Plan to Integrate Electric Cars on the Grid

Team takes first place in case competition tackling today’s energy challenges.

Four MIT students won first place in a competition by the U.S. Association of Energy Economics (USAEE) aimed at tackling today’s energy challenges and preparing solutions for policymakers and industry. More...

Introducing the China Energy and Climate Project

Multi-disciplinary research effort to develop new tools for tough questions

Multiple forecasts suggest that rapidly developing nations such as China will be responsible for most of the growth in carbon dioxide emissions over the next 50 years. This expectation is the driving force behind the formation of a new project involving researchers from MIT and China, known as the China Energy and Climate Project (CECP), which officially launched in October of 2011.

The CECP is an alliance between the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change and the Institute for Energy, Environment and Economy at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. At MIT, the CECP is associated with and supported by the MIT Energy InitiativeThe goal of the CECP is to analyze the impact of existing and proposed energy and climate policies in China on technology, energy use, the environment and economic welfare by applying — and, where necessary, developing — both quantitative and qualitative analysis tools. Read more.

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